Our summer services will begin on July 19

1024px-Summer_Solstice_Sunrise_over_Stonehenge_2005

Our regular services have concluded. Our lay-led summer services will begin on July 19. Services are held at 10:30 a.m., with coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Visitors are always welcome. Here is a list of the schedule and service leaders:

July 19

Our Favorite Poetry
Peter VanDeBogert

Participants are invited to read their favorite poems, plus any they may have written themselves.  Everything from Walt Whitman to Robert Frost to Mary Oliver and anything else. If you’re not into reading poetry, you’re welcome to just  come and listen. Most of the hour will be the same format as a regular service.

July 26

Ease
Brian Orr

Consciously and subconsciously our minds, bodies, and spirits work to get to a place of ease. This is what spirituality and religion comes down to at a basic level. It defines our search for comfort in our lives. Join us for an exploration of  “Ease.”

August 2

Silent Meditation
Peter VanDeBogert

This service could easily be a follow-up to Brian’s previous week’s theme. The first 15 minutes will follow the regular routine. The last 45 minutes or so will include a brief introduction and then the silent meditation itself, followed by optional sharing. Even if meditation is new to you, you will find this process easy, enjoyable, and perhaps revealing.

August 9

More Than Meets the Eye
Amy Tedford

This service  will explore various encounters Amy has had with animals, both wild and domestic; and offer some layman’s speculations about the connections between human and animal consciousness.

Note: The first service of the 2015-’16 church year will be held on Sunday, September 13.

Photo of summer solstice sunrise at Stonehenge via Wikimedia Commons.

This Sunday’s service: A year-end celebration

Autumn-flower-field-purple-flowers_-_Virginia_-_ForestWander

In our year-end service this Sunday, June 21, we will review the special, highly unique year we have had here at Northshore Church. There will be a recognition of new members and a presentation of the annual Frank Farnum Award. The service and the year will conclude with a flower-sharing ceremony. Please bring a at least one flower to church for flower sharing.

The service leader will be Tracee Kneeland.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Visitors are always welcome.

Following the service there will be an important congregational meeting. The Ministerial Search Committee has completed its work. Please come this Sunday for our final service, some exciting news, and an important vote.

This will mark our final regular service of the 2014-’15 church year. Our summer services will begin on July 19.

Photo (cc) by ForestWander and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

This Sunday’s service: “Return of Delight”

Julie Lombard

Julie Lombard

Our service this Sunday, June 14, will be on the topic “Return of Delight.” Our guest speaker will be Julie Lombard, an intern minister.

This message of hope unmasks a couple of unsung heroines and tells how they turned their do-gooding deeds into spiritual practices. It offers a year-end celebration uplifting volunteering as a place where passion and mission crisscross on the road to delight.

The service will also include a bridging ceremony for Remy Beauregard. Bridging is a Unitarian Universalist recognition of the transition into adulthood.

The offering will be donated to the UUA-UUSC joint appeal for Nepal relief work after the recent earthquakes there.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “I Got Plenty o’ Nuttin’”

Walden_Map_fromWalking_150dpiIn this sermon the Reverend Charles Wilson, a retired Northshore UU Church minister, will join the discussion between beauty and adornment, and luxury versus simplicity, solitude, and the study of sagacious minds.

We’ll listen again to Henry David Thoreau at Walden — with inspiration from Porgy. To refine the soul, Thoreau demonstrates by words and daily living a simple path to a more fulfilling life. He said, and Charles agrees, “We must balance the acquisition of accessories with the necessaries for the good of the planet, as well as our own personal wellbeing.”

The service leader is Peter VanDeBogert.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

A “car yard sale” will be held after the service. We have organized this to be a yard sale out of the trunk of your car. As you do your spring cleaning at home, pack up some of your junk in the trunk. If you sell it after the service, the proceeds can be given to the church.

This is also Food Sunday. Please bring food to the church and place it in the Food Pantry basket in the Fellowship Hall. Or you can donate via check or a grocery-store gift card.

Map image via the Concord Free Public Library.

This Sunday’s service: “Religious Exploration Sunday”

Please join the Religious Exploration children and leaders this Sunday, May 31, as we present to you a service that will encapsulate our UU year of exploration and discovery.

The service, to be led by Director of Religious Exploration Meryl Baier, will include all three groups of children including young, middle school, and senior youth group, as they present a spirited representation of their curriculum and what they have taken from it in both spirit and knowledge. This is our gift to you, so please plan on enjoying it with us!

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “Folk Music in the ’60s”

Bob Dylan in 2011

Bob Dylan in 2011

Please join us this Sunday, May 24, when guest speaker Hal Morse leads a service titled “The Social Relevance of Folk Music in the ’60s.”

Folk music in the 1960s, led by Bob Dylan, had a significant impact by elevating social consciousness on critical political and cultural issues such as the civil-rights and antiwar movements. The music became the primary agent of expression leading to the moral and spiritual progress of the Baby Boomer generation.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Photo (cc) by Francisco Antunes and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

This Sunday’s service: “When All Else Fails”

Our guest speaker this Sunday, May 17, will be Anne Principe, Unitarian Universalist Director of Faith Development. The topic of her talk is “When All Else Fails: Personal and Spiritual Practices for the Millennium.”

From the moment our day begins, we are presented if not confronted with a myriad of choices — what to do, what to choose, what to prioritize. Principe will lead us through exploration of how to frame our often hectic and busy lives with practices of calm, clarity, creativity, and more.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: Finding the sacred without God

Sam Keen

Sam Keen

Please join us at our service this Sunday, May 10, when the Reverend Steve Edington will speak on the topic “Finding the Sacred in the Absence of God.”

The sermon draws on Dr. Sam Keen’s book In the Absence of God: Dwelling in the Presence of the Sacred. It’s about how one discovers and cultivates a sense of the Sacred in living even if one does not embrace the concept of a supernatural Deity. What paths remain open for one’s spiritual searching after the forest has been cleared of dogma?

As part of this sermon Reverend Edington will share some of his own spiritual journey from conservative Christianity to a theological position known as “panentheism.”

The offering will be donated to Healing Abuse Working for Change (HAWC). After 30 years as “Help for Abused Women and their Children,” HAWC chose to change its name to “Healing Abuse Working for Change.” The new name aligns with HAWC’s commitment to serve all individuals affected by domestic abuse.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “A Spirituality Called Wisdom”

There is a lot of talk about spirituality these days, and some people say they are spiritual but not religious. But can we really “be spiritual”?

Please join us this Sunday, May 3, for a service titled “A Spirituality Called Wisdom.” Our guest speakers will be Michelle Walsh and Clyde Grubbs.

Perhaps spirituality is an activity, or, as the wise ones might say, a practice. Maybe we grow “in the spirit” by practicing and practicing again. And many people find that the way to grow “in the spirit” is in community, in the company of others who share the journey. Let us explore the spirituality called wisdom.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

The Northshore Church annual meeting will begin following the service.

This Sunday’s service: Celebrating the earth

earthdayCommemorating the 45th anniversary of Earth Day, the Northshore Church Green Sanctuary Committee is presenting an intergenerational service of music, poetry, and readings this Sunday, April 26.

Join us as we celebrate the earth we share and recommit to protecting and preserving the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part. Our guest speaker is Lynn Fletcher, Ph.D., biology professor at Salem State University, who will talk to us about environmental economics, a critical aspect of the discussion of climate change and sustainability issues.

The service leader is Gary Nelson.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.