This Sunday’s service: “Religious Exploration Sunday”

Please join the Religious Exploration children and leaders this Sunday, May 31, as we present to you a service that will encapsulate our UU year of exploration and discovery.

The service, to be led by Director of Religious Exploration Meryl Baier, will include all three groups of children including young, middle school, and senior youth group, as they present a spirited representation of their curriculum and what they have taken from it in both spirit and knowledge. This is our gift to you, so please plan on enjoying it with us!

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

“An Evening of Musing and Music” on May 29

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On Friday, May 29, the Northshore Church will present an evening of humor and song, from 7 p.m. until around 9:00. This fun event is open to the whole community.

Church members Jeri Kroll, Helen Brandt, Terri Hansen, and Judy Putnam are teaming up to bring you the evening’s entertainment. Helen and Terri, accompanied by Judy, will present a wide selection of music, solos and duets ranging from classical to popular, operetta to Broadway, from composers such as Purcell, Bernstein, and Barber.

In addition, we will “muse” together through Jeri’s very-funny-sometimes-off-beat — and somewhat irreverent — writings about the trials and tribulations of being a Unitarian Universalist.

There will be an intermission with refreshments. There is no admission fee, but donations will be gratefully accepted.

Illustration is in the public domain via pixabay.com.

This Sunday’s service: “Folk Music in the ’60s”

Bob Dylan in 2011

Bob Dylan in 2011

Please join us this Sunday, May 24, when guest speaker Hal Morse leads a service titled “The Social Relevance of Folk Music in the ’60s.”

Folk music in the 1960s, led by Bob Dylan, had a significant impact by elevating social consciousness on critical political and cultural issues such as the civil-rights and antiwar movements. The music became the primary agent of expression leading to the moral and spiritual progress of the Baby Boomer generation.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Photo (cc) by Francisco Antunes and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

This Sunday’s service: “When All Else Fails”

Our guest speaker this Sunday, May 17, will be Anne Principe, Unitarian Universalist Director of Faith Development. The topic of her talk is “When All Else Fails: Personal and Spiritual Practices for the Millennium.”

From the moment our day begins, we are presented if not confronted with a myriad of choices — what to do, what to choose, what to prioritize. Principe will lead us through exploration of how to frame our often hectic and busy lives with practices of calm, clarity, creativity, and more.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: Finding the sacred without God

Sam Keen

Sam Keen

Please join us at our service this Sunday, May 10, when the Reverend Steve Edington will speak on the topic “Finding the Sacred in the Absence of God.”

The sermon draws on Dr. Sam Keen’s book In the Absence of God: Dwelling in the Presence of the Sacred. It’s about how one discovers and cultivates a sense of the Sacred in living even if one does not embrace the concept of a supernatural Deity. What paths remain open for one’s spiritual searching after the forest has been cleared of dogma?

As part of this sermon Reverend Edington will share some of his own spiritual journey from conservative Christianity to a theological position known as “panentheism.”

The offering will be donated to Healing Abuse Working for Change (HAWC). After 30 years as “Help for Abused Women and their Children,” HAWC chose to change its name to “Healing Abuse Working for Change.” The new name aligns with HAWC’s commitment to serve all individuals affected by domestic abuse.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Updates to our online sermons

The audio for three recent sermons has now been posted here: “When the Devil Grabbed My Ankles,” by the Reverend Edwin Lynn, our minister emeritus; “Redemption Song,” by the Reverend Jeanne Nieuwejaar, a former NSUU interim minister; and “The Life of Bayard Rustin,” by church member Tom Duff.

If you didn’t have a chance to attend their services, please give a listen and hear what you missed.

This Sunday’s service: “A Spirituality Called Wisdom”

There is a lot of talk about spirituality these days, and some people say they are spiritual but not religious. But can we really “be spiritual”?

Please join us this Sunday, May 3, for a service titled “A Spirituality Called Wisdom.” Our guest speakers will be Michelle Walsh and Clyde Grubbs.

Perhaps spirituality is an activity, or, as the wise ones might say, a practice. Maybe we grow “in the spirit” by practicing and practicing again. And many people find that the way to grow “in the spirit” is in community, in the company of others who share the journey. Let us explore the spirituality called wisdom.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

The Northshore Church annual meeting will begin following the service.