This Sunday’s service: How to confront our fears

devil2Fear is a strong force in shaping political and social attitudes. The recent Ebola scare is a good example. Please join us this Sunday, April 19, when our minister emeritus, the Reverend Ed Lynn, will talk about the ways general fears relate to our more personal fears and how to confront them. The title of his sermon will be “When the Devil Grabbed My Ankles.”

Judy Putnam will perform several piano solo favorites, including “Memories” and “Clair de Lune.” The service leader is Peter VanDeBogart.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

After the service, join the Social Action Committee for lunch and a viewing of the film The New Economics 101: True Wealth in the New Economy. Economist and bestselling author Juliet Schor offers a refreshingly clear analysis of the ecological and social costs of mass consumerism and a passionate call to arms for radically rethinking our relationship to consumer goods.

This Sunday’s service: Discovering rail trails

Swamp off the Danvers Rail Trail behind the Northshore Church.

Swamp off the Danvers Rail Trail behind the Northshore Church.

Even a short walk on a rail trail is enough to refresh your mind and spirit. You might not have time to disappear completely into the wild, but you can squeeze in a nice nature walk along a rail trail as an option for getting your quick nature fix.

Please join us this Sunday, April 12, when Charles Lincicum, chair of the Danvers Rail Trail Advisory Committee, will speak on the topic of “Take a Walk and Discover the Value of Rail Trails.” We will share history, experiences, and observations from our local trails.

The service leader will be Gary Nelson.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “What Saves Us?”

4446560811_a5480c4636_bPeople the world over celebrate life and renewal in spring. What we know as Easter is wrapped in centuries of traditions across religions. In this year’s Easter service, we will come together to explore a story of transformation and celebrate new beginnings.

The sermon, “What Saves Us?”, will be presented by Betsy Mead Tabor, a candidate for the Unitarian Universalist ministry.

The service leader will be Peter VanDeBogert.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Photo (cc) by Ian Sane and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

New art exhibit to be presented at Northshore Church

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“The Friendly Neighborhood,” by Ginger Greenblatt

Two members of the North Shore Arts Association, Ginger Greenblatt and Judy Greulich, will present an exhibit of their works at the Northshore Unitarian Universalist Church throughout April and May. An artists’ reception will be held on Sunday, April 19, from 2 to 5 p.m.

Ginger Greenblatt is a retired nurse who enjoys watercolor and oil painting, and pencil, pen, and charcoal drawing. Recently she has been working in Japanese woodblock printing. “I’ve always admired woodblock prints,” Ginger says, “and it’s a process that now has me hooked.”

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“Reverie,” by Judy Greulich

Judy Greulich is a graduate of Montserrat School of Art. The subjects of her oil paintings are varied; they include the New England landscape, garden and still life as well as people in figurative settings and portraiture. Judy remarks, “Painting my subject directly from life is my primary and favorite approach.”

Both artists also work with the Malden Sketch Group and the Reading Art Association, as well as other groups.

The exhibit may be seen before and immediately after the 10:30 a.m. Sunday services, or by appointment by calling the church office.

This Sunday’s service: “Redemption Song”

Jeanne Nieuwejaar

Jeanne Nieuwejaar

The Reverend Jeanne Nieuwejaar, our interim minister during the 2007-’08 church year, will be back with us this Sunday, March 29, with a sermon titled “Redemption Song.”

The word redemption may have an archaic ring to it, but it is, in fact, a principle that is central to our liberal religious faith. Our affirmation of the worth and dignity of every individual is hollow unless we also affirm our commitment to help reclaim the value of individual lives that have become lost or broken. This is the work of redemption. In this service we will look in particular at the challenge of reclaiming the value of the lives of those who are serving time in prison, reflecting through the lens of our faith.

Following the service, Reverend Niewejaar invites you to meet with her for lunch and a discussion of her sermon topic.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Easter Bunny breakfast and egg hunt to be held April 4

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Come join the fun! The youth of the Northshore and Beverly Unitarian Universalist Churches invite you to come enjoy Easter breakfast and an egg hunt — a day early, on Saturday, April 4.  The Easter Bunny will make an appearance. All ages are welcome, and all proceeds go to the church youth groups.

The event will be held at the Northshore Church in Danvers, and will last from 10 a.m. until noon. The cost is $5 per person, with a maximum of $20 per family.

Photo (cc) by Gerbil and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

This Sunday’s service: The life of Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin

Please join us this Sunday, March 22, when Tom Duff will present the story of Bayard Rustin, a black Quaker gay singer who received the Medal of Freedom from President Obama.

Rustin is known as the organizer of the March on Washington in 1963, where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin was always eloquent himself, and shocked one’s expectations with his Oxford accent.

Rustin met Duff in 1952. Like Rustin, Duff was a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and a conscientious objector. Rustin convinced Duff to join the Congress of Racial Equality to work in the North, experimenting with non-violent social action.

Two years later, when Dr. King got his first church in Alabama at the start of an NAACP bus strike, A.J. Muste, founder of the fellowship, dispatched Rustin to persuade King to change the protest into an example of Gandhian pacifist non-violence. Rustin and a half-dozen others had been offering workshops on non-violence in churches and colleges for some years throughout the South. When King decided to embrace pacifism, the support of a dozen prominent black leaders was already assured to him.

Tom thinks that is almost a miracle.

The service leader will be Peter VanDeBogert.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.