Easter Bunny breakfast and egg hunt to be held April 4

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Come join the fun! The youth of the Northshore and Beverly Unitarian Universalist Churches invite you to come enjoy Easter breakfast and an egg hunt — a day early, on Saturday, April 4.  The Easter Bunny will make an appearance. All ages are welcome, and all proceeds go to the church youth groups.

The event will be held at the Northshore Church in Danvers, and will last from 10 a.m. until noon. The cost is $5 per person, with a maximum of $20 per family.

Photo (cc) by Gerbil and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

New art exhibit to be presented at Northshore Church

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“The Friendly Neighborhood,” by Ginger Greenblatt

Two members of the North Shore Arts Association, Ginger Greenblatt and Judy Greulich, will present an exhibit of their works at the Northshore Unitarian Universalist Church throughout April and May. An artists’ reception will be held on Sunday, April 19, from 2 to 5 p.m.

Ginger Greenblatt is a retired nurse who enjoys watercolor and oil painting, and pencil, pen, and charcoal drawing. Recently she has been working in Japanese woodblock printing. “I’ve always admired woodblock prints,” Ginger says, “and it’s a process that now has me hooked.”

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“Reverie,” by Judy Greulich

Judy Greulich is a graduate of Montserrat School of Art. The subjects of her oil paintings are varied; they include the New England landscape, garden and still life as well as people in figurative settings and portraiture. Judy remarks, “Painting my subject directly from life is my primary and favorite approach.”

Both artists also work with the Malden Sketch Group and the Reading Art Association, as well as other groups.

The exhibit may be seen before and immediately after the 10:30 a.m. Sunday services, or by appointment by calling the church office.

This Sunday’s service: “Redemption Song”

Jeanne Nieuwejaar

Jeanne Nieuwejaar

The Reverend Jeanne Nieuwejaar, our interim minister during the 2007-’08 church year, will be back with us this Sunday, March 29, with a sermon titled “Redemption Song.”

The word redemption may have an archaic ring to it, but it is, in fact, a principle that is central to our liberal religious faith. Our affirmation of the worth and dignity of every individual is hollow unless we also affirm our commitment to help reclaim the value of individual lives that have become lost or broken. This is the work of redemption. In this service we will look in particular at the challenge of reclaiming the value of the lives of those who are serving time in prison, reflecting through the lens of our faith.

Following the service, Reverend Niewejaar invites you to meet with her for lunch and a discussion of her sermon topic.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: The life of Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin

Please join us this Sunday, March 22, when Tom Duff will present the story of Bayard Rustin, a black Quaker gay singer who received the Medal of Freedom from President Obama.

Rustin is known as the organizer of the March on Washington in 1963, where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin was always eloquent himself, and shocked one’s expectations with his Oxford accent.

Rustin met Duff in 1952. Like Rustin, Duff was a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and a conscientious objector. Rustin convinced Duff to join the Congress of Racial Equality to work in the North, experimenting with non-violent social action.

Two years later, when Dr. King got his first church in Alabama at the start of an NAACP bus strike, A.J. Muste, founder of the fellowship, dispatched Rustin to persuade King to change the protest into an example of Gandhian pacifist non-violence. Rustin and a half-dozen others had been offering workshops on non-violence in churches and colleges for some years throughout the South. When King decided to embrace pacifism, the support of a dozen prominent black leaders was already assured to him.

Tom thinks that is almost a miracle.

The service leader will be Peter VanDeBogert.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: Square pegs and round holes

Allison Iantosca

Allison Iantosca

The speaker at our service this Sunday, March 15, will be Allison Iantosca, whose topic is “The Journey of a Square Peg in a World of Round Holes.”

Allison will share stories of her path through life: never quite fitting in, or perhaps just resisting being “typical.” From farm girl to a theater major at a performing arts high school; from a stint on the West Coast, auditioning and performing (a.k.a. waiting tables), to the helm of a successful $20 million general contracting business. Along the path there was never a perfect fit, yet there was much to be learned, people to be loved, and choices to be made.

Still a square peg, she is beginning to reshape the round holes to fit and accept a bit of squareness, discovering ways to soulfully manage her building business, and to share her experiences with others through her writing. Let us explore how we can bring our authentic stories and selves to bear on our passions and vocations.

The service leader is Jennifer Revill.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This week’s service: “Selma Sunday: A Call to Action”

The Selma to Montgomery marchers arrive in Montgomery. At center are Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King, with Ralph Abernathy's three children.

The Selma-to-Montgomery marchers arrive in Montgomery. At center are Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King.

Nearly 50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. sent a telegram to faith leaders around the country, calling on them to join the protest for voting rights in Selma, Alabama. Unitarian Universalists heeded the call. Around 200 UU ministers and hundreds of laypeople joined the protest. Two of them lost their lives.

Now, UUs are once more being called to continue witnessing against the disease of racism, voter disenfranchisement and the eroding of civil rights, the lack of justice (especially for the deaths of young men and transgender women of color), and escalating inequality in our country.

Join Social Action Committee chair Lois Markham and our congregation this Sunday, March 8, as we celebrate Selma Sunday with a look back at Unitarian Universalists’ participation in the Selma protest and a look forward to a new call to witness for social justice.

The service leader will be Tracee Swanson.

In keeping with the theme of the service, the offering will be donated to the James Reeb Fund for Multicultural Ministries and Leadership. Reeb was a UU minister from Boston who was attacked in Selma and died of wounds he suffered prior to the march. The James Reeb Fund supports multicultural growth throughout the UUA and in Unitarian Universalist congregations. This includes supporting congregations doing voting rights work and programs such as Finding Our Way Home, a retreat for religious professionals of color.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Photo via Wikipedia.

This Sunday’s service: “Mental Illness, There Is Hope”

Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 11.19.59 AMDeb Pacheco, a dynamic speaker and tireless advocate for those suffering with mental illness, will deliver our guest lecture this Sunday, March 1, on the topic of “Mental Illness, There Is Hope.”

Deb will her experiences with families and her hopes for the reframing of mental illness to a concept of mental wellness. She is specifically concerned with the risks of untreated mental illness. Deb is on the board of directors of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Massachusetts and is president of NAMI of Cape Ann.

March 1 is also Food Sunday. Good nutrition is essential for good health. The Danvers Food Pantry is currently having trouble keeping food in stock with an increasing number of people in need. There are three ways you can help: Bring food to church and place it in the Food Pantry basket in the Fellowship Hall; write a check made out to “Danvers Food Pantry”; donate a grocery store gift card. Check or gift card donations may be given to Nelson, Gwen, or Daniel Scottgale to deliver for you. Thanks for sharing with others.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.