This Sunday’s service: “Mental Illness, There Is Hope”

Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 11.19.59 AMDeb Pacheco, a dynamic speaker and tireless advocate for those suffering with mental illness, will deliver our guest lecture this Sunday, March 1, on the topic of “Mental Illness, There Is Hope.”

Deb will her experiences with families and her hopes for the reframing of mental illness to a concept of mental wellness. She is specifically concerned with the risks of untreated mental illness. Deb is on the board of directors of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Massachusetts and is president of NAMI of Cape Ann.

March 1 is also Food Sunday. Good nutrition is essential for good health. The Danvers Food Pantry is currently having trouble keeping food in stock with an increasing number of people in need. There are three ways you can help: Bring food to church and place it in the Food Pantry basket in the Fellowship Hall; write a check made out to “Danvers Food Pantry”; donate a grocery store gift card. Check or gift card donations may be given to Nelson, Gwen, or Daniel Scottgale to deliver for you. Thanks for sharing with others.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: Sharing our spiritual roots

This Sunday, February 22, we will try again. After major storms forced us to cancel our services two weeks in a row, another storm is predicted for this weekend. If we are able to gather, we will hold one of our popular roots services.

What are your spiritual roots? In this traditional service some of our members will share their spiritual journeys with us. We will reflect on the spiritual roots from which we have grown. For many of us it may be a story of the church in which we were raised. We probably remember the messages, spiritual or otherwise, that our family gave to us. Coming of age might have presented us with many questions and challenges of belief that most likely shape our beliefs. Peers, teachers, and social and political events may have played a role as well. Even in adulthood our life experiences and dilemmas may have caused us to re-examine our beliefs at least one more time.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “Blind Man’s Bluff”

Jacques Lusseyran

Jacques Lusseyran

Note: For the second weekend in a row, we are canceling this week’s service because of an impending winter storm.

The sermon topic at our service this Sunday, February 15, is “Blind Man’s Bluff,” to be delivered by guest speaker Barbara Schreur.

Darkness and light have often been used metaphorically to refer to different spiritual or existential states. Here in New England, however, it’s also easy to recognize darkness and light as literal, physical states into and out of which we all move.

Is there really anything so bright as the sun on freshly fallen snow here in the Northeast? And is there anything more conducive to blankets, soup, and good books than the fact that it starts getting dark by 5 p.m. here in the winter? What can we learn about ourselves from the ways in which we respond to light and to dark?

We’ll look at the extraordinary life and writings of a Frenchman named Jacques Lusseyran, who published a memoir about his experience of becoming blind at age 8 due to an accident, and ended up as a leader of the French Resistance in World War II, interred in and eventually rescued from the Buchenwald concentration camp.

The service leader will be Helen Brandt.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

This Sunday’s service: “I Got Plenty o’ Nuttin”

Walden Pond. Photo (cc) by Susy Morris and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

Walden Pond.

Note: The service was canceled because of the latest snow storm.

The Reverend Charles Wilson will speak this Sunday, February 8, on the difference between beauty and adornment, and luxury versus simplicity, solitude, and the study of sagacious minds. We’ll listen again to Henry David Thoreau at Walden — with inspiration from Porgy.

“To refine the soul,” Charles says, “Thoreau demonstrates by words and daily living a simple path to a more fulfilling life. He said, and I agree, we must balance the acquisition of accessories with the necessaries, for the good of the planet, as well as our own personal well-being.”

The service leader is Jennifer Revill.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.

Photo (cc) by Susy Morris and published under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved.

An evening of piano and trumpet this Friday

643coverBonnie Anderson and Joseph Foley will present a concert of piano and brass music on Friday, February 6, at 7:30 p.m. at the Northshore Unitarian Universalist Church.

As part of the release tour for their CD “Nightsongs,” they will play duets from Joseph Peasley’s “Nightsongs,” Strauss, Hindemuth, and more. You can meet the artists during the intermission reception, at which light refreshments will be served. “Nightsongs” CDs will be available for purchase.

Concert tickets are $25. In case of foul weather, the concert will be rescheduled for Saturday, February 14. (If you would like a preview of the concert music, go to their Kickstarter website.

During the concert intermission and reception, light refreshments will be served. We plan to include wine, cheese and crackers, and finger desserts.

This Sunday’s service: History of the Northshore Church

ParkSt.Church

The Park Street Church of Peabody

Come explore the history of Danvers and Peabody at our service this Sunday, February 1, with noted local historian Bonnie Hurd Smith in her talk “Conviction, Cooperation, and Faith: A History of the Northshore UU Church, 1815-1966.”

The Northshore UU Church represents the 1966 merger of Danvers and Peabody churches. There was once a separate Unitarian church and a Universalist church in each town; these founding “grandparent” churches are fondly remembered by some of the older members of today’s congregation. The origins of the Northshore UU Church go back to the first Universalist church in Danvers, in 1815. In Peabody, the first Unitarian church was established in 1825 in what would later be called the Park Street Church. Hurd Smith’s talk will touch on events over the past 200 years that affected the churches and their communities. (Click here for a brief history of the Northshore UU Church.)

Bonnie Hurd Smith is a well-known researcher, writer, and speaker on the North Shore and around Greater Boston. Through her communications company, History Smiths, she helps clients use history — their own story and their community’s — to engage audiences in ways that benefit both.

Bonnie holds two degrees from Simmons College, and she is the author of numerous books on women’s and local history. She was recently recognized by Oxford University Press as the definitive scholar on one of the founding 18th-century American Universalists, essayist Judith Sargent Murray of Gloucester. She resides in Salem.

February 1 is also Food Sunday. Good nutrition is essential for good health. The Danvers Food Pantry is currently having trouble keeping food in stock with an increasing number of people in need. There are three ways you can help: Bring food to church and place it in the Food Pantry basket in the Fellowship Hall; write a check made out to “Danvers Food Pantry”; donate a grocery store gift card. Check or gift card donations may be given to Nelson, Gwen, or Daniel Scottgale to deliver for you. Thanks for sharing with others.

The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by coffee and fellowship at about 11:30. Religious education classes are offered, and visitors are always welcome.